Turning 65 soon? Transitioning to dual Medicare and Medicaid coverage and getting help with costs

If you’re enrolled in Medicaid and will soon have Medicare eligibility, it’s not too soon to start planning ahead. Once Medicare eligibility begins, you’ll have a 7 month Initial Enrollment Period to sign up. For most people, this is 3 months before, the month of, and 3 months after their 65th birthday.

Once you have Medicare and Medicaid coverage, Medicare will cover your Part D prescription drugs and you’ll automatically qualify to get Extra Help paying for your drug costs. If you have limited income and resources, you may also qualify for help paying for your Medicare Part B premium and other Medicare costs, like deductibles and coinsurance. Medicare and your state Medicaid program work together to provide you with this help, called the Medicare Savings Programs.

The 4 Medicare Savings Programs (MSPs)

If you have income from working, you may qualify for these 4 MSPs, even if your income is higher than the income limits listed below. Each program has a different income and resource eligibility limit. Even if you don’t qualify for Medicaid, you may qualify for one of these programs to help you cover your Medicare costs.

How do I apply for Medicare Savings Programs?

If you answer yes to these 3 questions, call your State Medicaid Program to see if you qualify for a Medicare Savings Program in your state:

  1. Do you have, or are you eligible for, Part A?
  2. Is your monthly income for 2015 at, or below, $1,333 (single) or $1,790 (married or living together)?
  3. Do you have limited resources, less than $7,160 (single) or $10,750 (married or living together

It’s important to call or fill out an application if you think you could qualify for savings—even if your income or resources are higher than the amounts listed here.

What items are included in the Medicare Savings Program resource limits?

Countable resources include:

  • Money in a checking or savings account
  • Stocks
  • Bonds

Countable resources don’t include:

  • Your home
  • One car
  • Burial plot
  • Up to $1,500 for burial expenses if you have put that money aside
  • Furniture
  • Other household and personal items

How can I keep my costs down?

Filed under: Medicare coverage, Uncategorized
Source: Medicare

Traditional Medicare is Working!

Traditional Medicare works!  Researchers looked at 60 million people on traditional Medicare between 1999 and 2013.  They found that mortality rates dropped steadily, and people were less likely to end up in the hospital.  The improvement comes from a combination of health prevention programs, improved medical technology, and care shifting from hospitals to less expensive outpatient facilities. People who were hospitalized were having much better outcomes.  They had a much better chance for survival!

Tradititional Medicare Card

Traditional Medicare is improving people’s lives!

Protect yourself from pneumonia and other infections

Did you know that 900,000 Americans get pneumonia every year? Pneumonia is a lung infection caused by pneumococcal disease, which can also cause blood infections and meningitis. The bacteria that causes pneumococcal disease is spread by direct person-to-person contact.

Medicare can help protect you from pneumococcal infections. The best way to prevent these infections is by getting the pneumococcal shot. Medicare Part B covers the shot and a second one 11 months after you got the first shot for anyone with Part B.

You may be at a higher risk for these infections if you:

  • Are 65 or older
  • Have a chronic illness (like asthma, diabetes, or lung, heart, liver, or kidney disease)
  • Have a condition that weakens your immune system (like HIV, AIDS, or cancer)
  • Live in a nursing home or other long-term care facility
  • Have cochlear implants or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks
  • Smoke tobacco

You can learn more about Medicare-covered vaccines by watching our video. Take an easy step towards prevention, and get your pneumococcal shot today.

Filed under: Medicare coverage, Uncategorized
Source: Medicare